Julie Carpenter, Ph.D.

People+Technology+Culture

CV

A full version of my CV as a PDF.

Education

University of Washington, Seattle, WA
Ph.D., Educational Psychology, 2013

Dissertation: The Quiet Professional: An investigation of U.S. military Explosive Ordnance Disposal personnel interactions with everyday field robots. (2013).

Research Summary: I use qualitative methods and a human-centered research approach to find ways of understanding the complex ecosystems of human behavior, actions, and cultural influences related to human-technology interactions. My work presents frameworks for understanding what behavioral phenomena are occurring, explain why these interactions are playing out the way they are, and predict future emerging patterns of human behavior based on these findings. 

University of Washington, Seattle, WA
M.S., Technical and Scientific Communication (Human-Centered Design and Engineering), 2007

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
M.S., Technical Communication, 2004
Area of Concentration: Human-Computer Interaction

University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
B.A., Communication Arts, 1999
Area of Concentration: Film, Radio, and Television Theory

Publications and presentations

(Name appears as both J. Carpenter and J. Hillan)

Books
Carpenter, J. (Manuscript in progress, expected 2023). The Naked Android: Synthetic socialness and the human gaze. UK: CRC Press/Taylor & Francis Group.
Carpenter, J. (2016). Culture and human-robot interaction in militarized spaces: A war story. UK: Routledge/Taylor & Francis.

Book Chapters

Carpenter, J. A solitary thing: Emotional intimacy and the idea of cheating in committed human-human relationships with a robot. [Expected 2022]. In Gender in AI and robotics: Gender challenges from an interdisciplinary perspective. Jordi Vallverdú, UAB, Ed. Switzerland: Springer.
Carpenter, J. (2021). "Robots as solace and the valence of loneliness." In A. Campbell, Ed, The Lovemakers. Ed. UK: Goldsmiths Press.
Carpenter, J. Kill switch: The evolution of road rage in an increasingly AI car culture. (2020). Funded under Ethics + Emerging Sciences Group (California Polytechnic State University); National Science Foundation, Grant No. 1522240. In E. De Visser, R. Pak & E. Rovira [Eds.] Living with robots: Emerging issues on the pschological and social implications of robotics.. Amsterdam: Elsivier.
Carpenter, J. (2016). Deus Sex Machina: Loving robot sex workers, and the allure of an insincere kiss. In J. Danaher & N. McArthur (Eds.), Sex Robots: Social, Legal and Ethical Implications. (2017.) Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
Carpenter, J. (2013). Just Doesn’t Look Right: Exploring the impact of humanoid robot integration into Explosive Ordnance Disposal teams. In R. Luppicini (Ed.), Handbook of Research on Technoself: Identity in a Technological Society (pp. 609-636). Hershey, PA: Information Science Publishing. doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-2211-1.

Peer-reviewed journals
Carpenter, J., Davis, J., Erwin-Stewart, N., Lee. T., Bransford, J. & Vye, N. (2009). Gender representation in humanoid robots for domestic use. International Journal of Social Robotics (special issue). 1(3), 261-265. The Netherlands: Springer.
Reichenbach, J., Bartneck, C., & Carpenter, J. (2008). The Carrot and the stick - The role of praise and punishment in human-robot interaction. Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and communication in biological and artificial systems; special issue of on "Human and robot interactive communication." 9 (2), 179-203. Oxford, UK: Ingenta.
Hillan, J. (October, 2003). Physician use of patient-centered Web logs and journals. Clinical Medicine and Research. 1(4), 333-334. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Libraries.
Hillan, J. (July, 2003). PatchWorx: Connecting ill and disabled children in an online community. Clinical Medicine and Research. 1(3), 259-260. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Libraries.

Peer-reviewed conference proceedings - Full papers
Carpenter, J. (2009). Why send the Terminator to do R2D2’s job?: Designing androids as rhetorical phenomena. Proceedings of HCI 2009: Beyond Gray Droids: Domestic Robot Design for the 21st Century. Cambridge, UK. Sept. 1.
Carpenter, J., Davis, J., Erwin-Stewart, N., Lee. T., Bransford, J. & Vye, N. (2008). Invisible machinery in function, not form: User expectations of a domestic humanoid robot. Proceedings of 6th conference on Design and Emotion. Hong Kong, China.
Carpenter, J., Eliot, M. & Schultheis, D. (2006). Machine or friend: understanding users’ preferences for and expectations of a humanoid robot companion. Proceedings of 5th conference on Design and Emotion. Göteburg, Sweden.
Reichenbach, J., Bartneck, C., & Carpenter, J. (2006). Well done robot! The importance of praise and presence in human-robot collaboration. Proceedings of RO-MAN 06: The 15th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication, 86-90. Hatfield, UK.
Bartneck, C., Reichenbach, J., Carpenter, J., & Hupfeld, F. (2006). Use of praise and punishment in human-robot collaborative teams. Proceedings of RO-MAN 06: The 15th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication, 177-182. Hatfield, UK.

Peer-reviewed conference Proceedings - Short papers and presentations
Carpenter, J., Davis, J. Erwin-Stewart, N. Lee. T., Bransford, J. & Vye, N. (2008). Gender representation in humanoid robots for domestic use. 1st International Conference on Human-Robot Personal Relationships. June 12-13. Maastrict, The Netherlands.
Carpenter, J., Eliot, M. & Schultheis, D. (2006). The Uncanny Valley: Making human-nonhuman distinctions. Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Cognitive Science, 81-82. Vancouver, B.C., Canada.
Carpenter, J. (2006). Exploring Human-Centered Design in Human-Robot Interaction. Presented at HRI Young Researchers Workshop, in conjunction with HRI 2006. Salt Lake City, UT.
Hillan, J. (2005) The necessity of enforcing multidisciplinary research and development of embodied Socially Intelligent Agents. Proceedings of AISB 2005. British Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and the Simulation of Behaviour, 133-140. Hertfordshire, UK.

Other publications
Carpenter, J. (2014, September). The existential robot: Living with robots may teach us to be better humans. Issues, 108, 39-42.
Carpenter, J. (2016, May). Shaping the future of war: The important questions. Los Angeles Review of Books Digital Edition, pp. 84-89. The digital revolution: Debating the promise and perils of the Internet in the last years of the Obama administration. (Eds. M. Pridmore-Brown & J. Crockett).
Carpenter, J.Why Project Q is more than the world's first nonbinary voice for technology. (2019, November-December). ACM Interactions.Vol. XXVI.6., p. 56.

Invited presentations
Asmussen, E. & Carpenter, J. (2019, June). Jury co-presentor for Project Q. Cannes-Lions International Festival for Creativity. Cannes: France.
Carpenter, J. (2021, May 20). I, AI. [keynote]. Augmented Authorship – Digital Strategies for Artistic Collaboration. Haus der Elektronischen Künste (HEK). Basel, Switzerland.
Carpenter, J. (November, 2019). Flipping the script: Q and nonbinary voice. "Why is AI a woman? ": Design for Different Futures. [Panel]. Philadelphia Museum of Art. Philadelphia, PA.
Carpenter, J. (2018, August 21). UX Week. Dark patterns and the ethics of robot design. San Francisco, CA.
Carpenter, J. (2016, November 4). The robot is the medium: Our ethical responsibilities as makers. 6th Digital Ethics Symposium. Loyola University. Chicago, IL.
Carpenter, J. (2016, March 3). Humans + Robots: Dream Machines. TEDxEAL. Odense, Denmark.
Carpenter, J. (2014, May 14). DroneU: The emotional consequences of operating a military drone. Future Tense/SLATE.
Carpenter, J. (2014). The Robot Accommodation Dilemma: Human-field robot interactions, attachment, and operator decision-making. IDGA Counter-IED Training Forum. Arlington, VA.
Sherman, R. & Carpenter, J. (2019, June). Jury co-presentor for Project Q. Cannes-Lions International Festival for Creativity. Cannes: France.

Awards and Nominations

Lighthouse3 100 Brilliant Women in AI Ethics to Follow in 2019 and Beyond
Lighthouse3 100 Brilliant Women in AI Ethics to Follow in 2020 and Beyond.
Project Q. (2019). As research consultant with VICE/VIRTUE-Copenhagen and Copenhagen Pride: Bronze Glass Lion for Change. Cannes: France.

Research experience

Qualitative Researcher
Meta, Contract via TMP, San Francisco (remote), October 2021-Present (July 2022)
Own multiple user experience research (UXR) projects on internal tools in the Central Integrity pillar that human reviewers and SMEs who assess potential harmful violations use to enforce social media policy at scale. Responsibilities include stakeholder alignment (i.e., engineering, design, product managers), human-centered research planning, conducting, analyses, synthesis of findings, and communicating the UXR processes, actionable recommendations, and user insights to cross-functional (XFN) teams in a fast-paced environment.

Advisor, Human-Machine Teaming (HUM–T) in Trusted Autonomous Systems (TAS) Operations (Australian Defence Group)
March 2022-Present
HUM–T must be safe, trusted in military deployment, and enable flexible operations without undue operational restrictions. This project explores the development of appropriate safety requirements and frameworks, including appropriate methods to manage and communicate these, for HUM–T operations. Under the direction of Research Fellow Dr. Zena Assad.

Research consultant (freelance), SeekAI
March 2022-Present
Advising on UX R&D strategies, short and long-term. Startup SeekAI is building a Web-based B2B data science management tool.

Research Scientist, Associate Research and Development Principal
Accenture Labs (San Jose/San Francisco), 2018-2021
Generative and evaluative human-technology interaction research and development projects (e.g., human-robot teaming; autonomous vehicle interiors; retail shopping). Designed, led, and conducted original user-centered research with consideration for multiple project timelines and resources in an agile environment.

Fellow, "Ethics + Emerging Sciences Group"
California Polytechnic State University (CalPoly), 2015-Present
Ethics, risk, and social concern assessment. Publishing projects. Engage policymakers, business, academia, as well as the broader public on key issues in science and society.

Assistant Director, "Engineering Communication Program"
University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 2007-2008
Managed the Engineering Writing Center (EWC). Assisted the Director with TA support and training (for 231 and 333 TAs), developed workshops for faculty in the College of Engineering. Wrote proposals for funding and special topics courses. Developed and taught "Introduction to Theories, Methods, and Materials of Writing Center Tutoring" (TC 499) course.

Directed Research, "Curriculum Design and Engineering Writing"
University of Washington, 2006-2007
Researched and developed curriculum for grant writing workshops hosted by the Department of Technical Communication. Reviewed current TC 333 curriculum and collaborated to develop new teaching materials. Collected, organized and archived original classroom materials developed by current TC 333 Teaching Associates, including lecture notes and supplementary materials such as PowerPoint and instructions for group exercises.

Directed Research, "Internet-Based Research/Examining Computer Supported Cooperative Work"
University of Washington, 2005
Used the Internet to empirically study the effectiveness of electronically delivered information. Worked on refining an Internet-based research tool, study of information design on users’ behavior and performance in computer supported cooperative work environments, with a specific focus on the assessment of wikis. Identified questions and subjects for study, read relevant literature and collaborated on experiment design.

Graduate Research Associate, "Hall Health, AEDSports.com"
University of Washington, 2005
Assembled Web design team and supervised two undergraduate Research Assistants. Managed the development of two Web sites: (a) a Web-based survey on NCAA AED use and (b) a Web-based interface for online survey database administration.

Directed Research, "Computer Games"
University of Washington, 2005
Researched the cultural aspects of games, including a project of player-avatar identification in EverQuest.

 

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